Letters from the Lunar Outpost

Selfishness is the greatest sin. It constrains the heart. It separates man from man. It makes him greedy. It is the root of all evils and sufferings. Destroy selfishness through selfless service, charity, generosity and love.
- Sivananda, Indian Physician and Sage (1887-1963)

So a few people on the Internet couldn’t help but notice that after 16 years of existence, Google chose today as the day they would honor Cesar Chavez’ birthday . . .

Cesar Chavez Honored by Google on Easter Sunday

Today also happens to be Easter Sunday, the day that marks the Resurrection of Christ for the Christian faithful around the world, but hey, I don’t know why people are freaking out over Google’s choice of a leftist labor leader over the chosen Savior of two billion people. After all, Google has chosen to ignore Easter for thirteen straight years now. The last time Google recognized Easter was in their third year of existence back in 2000.

So I’m trying to figure out my reply to Google’s ongoing snub of the two billion faithful and I’m remembering how I was told that if you want to be a Christian, you should strive to be Christ-like in everything you do. Whenever you come to a decision point, you should ask yourself, WWJD – What Would Jesus Do? In this case, I asked myself, how would Jesus respond?

Unfortunately, I can’t really imagine what an Internet Jesus would tweet about this, so I decided to do the next best thing and take a positive course of action.

There, fixed it for you, Google!

Google Crown of Thorns

I’m also fixing the default search engine on all the browsers in the house as well.

Happy Easter, all.

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25 Responses to Happy Easter from Google

  • Way to go Mike. I’ve decided, I’m not going to worry about them. Today marks our 5th year, that we have attended the 76th Annual Lizard Butte Sunrise Service in Idaho since moving here. You climb a hill with other Christians, look up the Treasure Valley, seated above the Snake River, and watch the Sun come up on the left, while the moon sits to your right. A cross with angels standing beside it to our backs. We Pledge the elegance to the flag, then to God, while as almost planned, a flock of geese fly in formation over head. The birds have come every year we have been there. In the background, you hear the sound of Roosters crowing. Where is Peter? Now, tell me there is no God? A Perfect day, so I will forgive.

    • Wow, what a lovely picture you paint of the whole scene, Carrie. The geese flying over on cue for the fifth year running, love it! (So glad I went with the positive over my first impulse after reading your reply!) Sounds beautiful, thanks for sharing.

  • What would Jesus do? He would probably just sigh and say, “I’m not surprised…” Furthermore, Google is merely a tool; and like all tools, it has its useful life and, beyond that, it’s irrelevant. I think it’s a shame that a public presence usurps its power to promote something inappropriately, like Chavez’s face on Easter Sunday. I don’t care that it’s his birthday — it was distasteful and blatantly aloof to the gravity of the holiday. The people at Google are probably like most liberals: they don’t give a holy s&*#. It’s a turn off alright. I may use them as a search engine, but I wouldn’t buy their stock; just as I don’t go to Starbucks anymore…Christians have more class; they quietly do what they feel is right within their hearts, and don’t go publicly rubbing it into the faces of those who oppose them or philosophically disagree.

    • They are so smug in their anti-religious faith, aren’t they? It is a turn off. I’ve been using Google since before most people knew what a google was. I had an Android for a while, but my last phone was a WIndows Phone and that’s definitely not going to change after this.

      • and Microsoft isn’t just another Godless corporation?

        • Bill and Melinda Gates have done more good for humanity than any single government.

          • > Bill and Melinda Gates have done more good for humanity than any single government.

            The Bill and Melinda Gatest who are aggressively promoting abortion and contraception world-wide, including countries where they are not presently legal? Keeping in mind that IUDs function by preventing implantation of fertilized embryos (an abortion), and that hormonal contraceptives have secondary effects that are abortifacient when they fail to suppress ovulation (not uncommon).

            Yes, the Gates Foundation supports many worthwhile projects. Unfortunately, these efforts are overshadowed by the human lives lost as a result of their support — to say nothing of the physical, psychological, and spiritual damage to the mothers of those who will never be born.

          • Interesting angle I’d never thought of or even heard of, thanks for sharing, Jerry, although I do think equating IUD’s with abortions is a bit extreme.

    • Pastor Fred Waldron Phelps, Sr. – Christian Preacher

      Does he “quietly do what they feel is right within their hearts, and don’t go publicly rubbing it into the faces of those who oppose them or philosophically disagree.”

      I think not.

      Christianity is not the sole domain of conservatives or liberals.

      He is not to be owned… just loved.

      • Westboro Baptist Church is one of half-a-million churches in the U.S. For an obscure little church in a podunk town like that, they must feel quite satisfied with how much the press has eagerly covered all their hateful neon signs and protests at soliders’ funerals. I can’t wait to see how that works out for them when they’re judged by the God they so ignorantly claim to serve.

  • Forgive them father.

    • That was my favorite part of the entire Bible miniseries! That was so powerful I couldn’t keep the tears at bay when Jesus said that up on the cross. Watching that series over the last five weeks must have softened my heart, because normally my first instinct would be to just completely slam the religion-haters at Google.

  • I think Jesus would want to honor others’ that do good for humanity as well, in the same manner that we honor HIM on his birthday. Just my thought……. Like JZ said “Google is merely a tool”.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%C3%A9sar_Ch%C3%A1vez

    • He was incredibly humble for being the King of Kings, wasn’t he. I agree with you, he would have probably said something very gracious about Cesar Chavez and Google before reminding people that He is the way and the truth and the life.

  • Cesar Chavez was Christian. He was an American. He was an farm worker disgusted with the way agribusiness treated their workers; He responded with non-violent organizing. The States of California, Colorado, and Texas have honored him with a State Holiday for this legacy. That day is March 31st; his birthday. Google didn’t choose the day, God chose that day for Cesar Chavez to be born. Google is just another California Corporation. What is un-American here?

    I think Jesus would honor Mr. Chavez as a compassionate human standing up for the little guys. The meek and the weak.

    Jesus spoke remarkably often about wealth and poverty. To the poor he said, “Blessed are you poor, for yours is the kingdom of God,” (Luke’s version). To the rich he said, “Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth,” and “go, sell what you have, and give to the poor.” When the rich turned away from him because they couldn’t follow his command he observed, “it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God.”

    For Jesus, helping the poor and the outcast is not optional: it is the essence of what it means to love God.

    We are to “forgive our debtors” and “give to every one who begs from you.” But don’t handouts contribute to moral decay? Jesus was more concerned about the moral decay in those who are so attached to their wealth that they would hoard it for themselves.

    America is as much an economic phenomenon as it is a nation. It is built on a system whose driving force is the profit motive. Our economy blatantly rewards greed. In classic economic theory greed is good. A person who is motivated by greed will create, as unintended byproducts, benefits for everyone, such as employment and the development of new goods and services.

    Greed may be a driving force for the economy, but Jesus saw it is as destructive to community. Greed may leave a few crumbs behind for the poor, and it may do some unintended good, but it destroys compassion. Compassion is in short supply in our society today where workers are being downsized in the name of efficiency, prisons are being expanded to insulate society from its underclasses, and the middle class is abandoned by the rich to fight it out with the poor for the table scraps.

    If this is conservatism… I want no part of it.

    • What’s more compassionate than giving someone a job? Would rather have indolent poor receiving food stamps and welfare for the rest of their lives?

  • Here was my response to Google on Easter http://twitpic.com/cg0hwk

  • Google is not a Christian organization. It’s better that they leave the Christian stuff to Christians. I’d bet dollars to falafels that they don’t do a Soupy Sales, or any other celebrity doodle when Ramadan comes around though. They’ll be Mohammed’s bitch.

  • I personally would have liked to see both the ‘OO’s in Google as the 2 tablets of the 10 Commandments. As Jesus was Jewish, as am I, we were in the middle of Pesach ‘Passover’ which Jesus would also have been celebrating on that day….We celebrated the end of Pesach with a pizza so if it was today I would have chosen a double OO of the delicious treat…. 🙂

  • As a Jew, Jesus would probably be continuing to count the 49 days of the Omer offering until the Festival of Shavuot on the 50th day after Passover.

    Accepting the Torah in his heart would have been more important to him than the perceiving of slights to a holiday that didn’t even exist in his lifetime.

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