Letters from the Lunar Outpost

Action is coarsened thought; thought becomes concrete, obscure, and unconscious.
- Henri Frederic Amiel, Swiss Philosopher and Critic (1821-1881)

Political Rehab, Day 18: The challenge was 30 political-free posts in 30 days. I’ve managed 5 in 18. I definitely have to step it up. BTW, I’m classifying this as a post about business and judiciary actions.

NFL Lockout

MINNEAPOLIS — The NFL filed a brief with the 8th U.S. District Court of Appeals in St. Louis on Monday, arguing that the lockout should remain on hold permanently while the two sides hash things out in court. A three-judge panel of the appeals court put an order lifting the lockout on hold temporarily last week and the owners reinstated the lockout a few hours later. In an 18-page brief, the NFL again argued that U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson shouldn’t have jurisdiction over a matter that grew from a labor dispute.

Source: AP

As much as I hate both sides for putting the season in jeopardy, can someone please tell me where the hell this Judge Nelson gets off telling the owners they had to open their facilities to the players? If someone buys a team and owns the facilities, how do you imagine you have the right to force them to open the doors of their facilities to anyone?

With that kind of logic, if your nanny and your cook started demanding more money than you wanted to pay and you told them not to come over to the house anymore until you were able to reach an agreement, a judge could come along and tell you, “I have decided that you will continue to allow your employees into your home whether you like it or not.”

That’s all sideshow, really, but I found the previous judge’s ruling pretty hard to fathom. Just figure it out guys. Life with $5 gasoline is bad enough, life with $5 gas and no NFL might be enough to make law abiding citizens riot.

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