Letters from the Lunar Outpost

The greatest harm that you can do unto the envious, is to do well.
- John Lyly, English Dramatist and Prose Writer (1554-1606)

Why the Timer-Warner Blackout of CBS Is a GOOD Thing

With the CBS blackout entering its third week, calls for federal regulators’ intervention and a quick settlement between the network and Time Warner Cable are growing louder as the NFL season gets underway.

U.S. Sens. Barbara Boxer and Dianne Feinstein, both California Democrats, sent a letter to the companies Monday, urging both parties to agree on a contract.

source: USA Today

Sorry senators, but we don’t need the heavy hand of government coming down and trying to force a resolution here. Both companies are run by grown-ups and both are accountable to their customers as well as to their shareholders. Both companies felt it was in their best interest to take a stand here, but you can have complete confidence in the fact that these companies have a self-preservation instinct as strong as anything living! Why try to impose some sort of artificial solution on them when the free market will allow these companies to come to a solution naturally?

You know what, though? I think every single day that Time-Warner continues its blackout of CBS is a good day for America. I applaud Time-Warner’s blackout of CBS and you should, too.

Why?

Because it brings us one step close to the day when we will be able to order all our channels a la cart, as it should be, only having to pay for the channels you want to watch, instead of being forced to pay for a bunch of channels you never watch and maybe even strongly object to.

To hell with CBS and all the Obama-loving cheerleading they pass off as the news. I don’t want to pay for that garbage. I do not want to support their campaigns of running straight propaganda through their news broadcasts, with many of their other shows carrying a political agenda as well.

To hell with CBS, if my team’s playing a game and it happens to be on CBS, I’d just as soon go down to the bar to watch it. As a matter of fact, if we had Time-Warner in our area, I’d make the switch right now, just to support Time-Warner for locking horns with CBS and putting that network in its place.

This is America. To quote the Burger King slogan, we should have it our way. I look forward to the day when having basic cable no longer means you’re forced to support Obama’s cheerleading squad of ABC-NBC-CBS-PBS-CNN-MSNBC. Those channels are no better than the shit the governments try to force down the throats of people living in countries like Iran, Cuba and North Korea. Give the people of America cable a la cart and allow people to choose whether they want to pay for those channels or not and watch these clown organizations either rediscover the meaning of the word “journalism” or wither on the vine.

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3 Responses to Why the Timer-Warner Blackout of CBS Is a GOOD Thing

  • Couldn’t agree with you more. As I was reading your article I got a phone call from a survey company asking about the negotiations. I gave CBS 100% of the blame for this brouhaha. Won’t miss them a bit.

  • I love the idea of being able to pick only the channels I want. It’s about time someone stood up to CBS. This was a great article. Thank you.

  • Why should TWC pay CBS more money? Before cable became popular in the 1980s most people put up antennas and received the local CBS station for free. CBS only made money on advertising. As more communities were built, some of them further out of town where the signal was weak; and some newer communities had underground utilities and forbade rooftop antennas, and condos where rooftop antennas are impossible increased in numbers, cable companies provide the TV signal to homes who could not receive it any other way. This brought more viewers to CBS and other networks who wouldn’t otherwise get a signal and kept customers for those networks when they moved to newer communities or the elderly, tired out the chores of the big house and big yard of their child raising years, moved to a condo. In 1970 almost everybody had a TV antenna on their single family homes. Some smaller apartment buildings had a ‘community’ antenna. We have gone from an era where 85% of people got their TV from an antenna to 85% of people get their TV signal from a cable or satellite dish. For bringing them customers, CBS wants to charge TWC more moeny? Is that like a restaurant wanting taxi drivers to pay them for every customer they bring to the restaurant? You would almost think it should be the other way around: CBS should pay a fee to TWC.

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